Smokers vow to quit heading into the New Year: how to do it


Smokers vow to quit heading into the New Year: how to do it

BUFFALO, N.Y. (WIVB) –  As the ball drops in Roosevelt Plaza Saturday evening. Western New Yorkers will vow to smoke their last cigarette.
Nearly 7 out 10 people in the U.S. want to quit smoking in 2017.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), getting a primary care provider’s advice and assistance more than doubles the odds that a person will quit successfully. In addition to providing a range of support options for quitting, a medical professional can help patients decide what treatment course is best for them, whether medication, counseling or relaxation therapy.

Now there are resources to help. Often times those resources are covered through your healthcare plan too. Paula Celestino, Project Director with Roswell Park Cessation Services said, there is more help available now then ever to help you quit. She said, “There is stop-smoking medication coverage through your healthcare plans, even sometimes coaching and counseling can be covered.”
But willpower alone will not do it. Celestino advises to separate yourself from smoking: just like you’re in a bad relationship. She said, “It’s like losing a best friend. But that best friend is probably the worst relationship you ever had.”
Dr. Anthony Hyland said while smoking rates have gone down across the country, it’s still the number one preventable cause of death in the country.
Dr. Hyland, PhD, Chair of the Department of Health Behavior at Roswell Park Cancer Institute and Director of the New York State Smokers’ Quitline said, “I also encourage physicians to talk to their patients about quitting at every visit.”
He said, the earlier you quit, the better off you’ll be. “For those with children, they’re going to be around longer to see their kids experiencing life,” he said.
And no matter how old you are, it’s never too late. He said, “Quitting as soon as possible is going to be the most helpful to individuals but its never too late to quit. There are studies even in older individuals who quit they extend their life and improve their quality of life.”
For a free personalized quit plan, talk to your doctor and for more support, contact the New York State Smokers’ Quitline at 1-866-NY-QUITS or http://www.nysmokefree.com. The Quitline can offer a variety of resources and support including phone coaching, automatic quit messages to your mobile number, landline or email, and a free starter kit of nicotine patches for eligible smokers.


Source: Buffalo New York’s Latest News
Smokers vow to quit heading into the New Year: how to do it

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